Nobel Prize in Chemistry

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry is awarded annually by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences to scientists in the various fields of chemistry.

2014

Eric Betzig

Eric Betzig was awarded 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry “For the Development of Super-Resolved Fluorescence Microscopy” which is capable of measuring images of molecules from within living cells.

Nobel Prize in Physics

The Nobel Prize is among the world's most coveted award in intellectual achievement. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded Nobel Prizes in Physics since 1901.

2009

Willard Boyle and George Smith

Invention and development of the charge-coupled device (CCD), a technology that transforms patterns of light into useful digital information and is the basis for many forms of modern imaging.

1998

Horst Stormer, Daniel Tsui, and Robert Laughlin

Discovery and explanation of a new form of quantum fluid with fractionally charged excitations (the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect.)

1997

Steven Chu

Development of methods to cool and trap atoms with laser light. (Prize shared with Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and William D. Phillips.)

1978

Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson

Discovery of the cosmic microwave background radiation that in turn provided clear substantiation of the "big bang" theory of how the universe began.

1977

Philip Anderson

Fundamental theoretical insights into the electronic structure of magnetic and disordered systems". (Prize shared with Sir Nevill Francis Mott and John Hasbrouck van Vleck.)

1956

John Bardeen, Walter Brattain and William Shockley

Research on semiconductors that led to the invention of the transistor in 1947.

1937

Clinton Davisson

Discovery of the diffraction of electrons by crystals and demonstrated the wave nature of matter. (Prize shared with George Paget Thomson.)

U.S. National Medal of Science

Established by the United States Congress in 1959 and first awarded in 1963, the National Medal of Science is presented by the U.S. President to individuals "deserving of special recognition by reason of their outstanding contributions to knowledge in the physical, biological, mathematical, or engineering sciences."

1996

C. Kumar Patel

Invention of the carbon dioxide laser, which led to numerous scientific, industrial, and medical applications.

1996

James Flanagan

Applying engineering techniques and speech science to solve underlying problems in speech communication.

1993

Al Cho

Pioneering research leading to the development of molecular beam epitaxy, a technique that revolutionized thin film growth making possible atomically accurate structures for electronic and optoelectronic devices, and for the study of new quantum phenomena.

1988

William O. Baker

Pioneering studies of the complex relationships between the molecular structures and physical properties of polymers; a distinguished record of leadership in the combined disciplines of science and engineering; distinguished service to government and education.

1986

Solomon Buchsbaum

Contributions to science and technology policy in the United States.

1982

Philip Anderson

Fundamental contributions to the theoretical understanding of condensed matter.

1974

Rudolph Kompfner

Invention of the traveling-wave tube as well as highly significant scientific insights underlying communication satellites and optical communications.

1973

John Tukey

Mathematical and theoretical statistical contributions including the analytical tool known as fast Fourier transform for understanding waveforms in fields from astrophysics to electrical engineering.

1963

John Pierce

Contributions to communications theory, electron optics and traveling wave tubes, and for the analysis leading to world-wide radio communications using artificial earth satellites.

1991

Arthur Schawlow

The conception of the laser and in advancing its applications, especially in laser spectroscopy.

1982

Charles Townes

Contributions to the understanding of matter through its interaction with electromagnetic radiations and the application of this knowledge towards the invention of the maser and laser.

1966

Claude Shannon

Brilliant contributions to the mathematical theories of communications and information processing.

U.S. National Medal of Technology & Innovation

Established by the United States Congress in 1980, and first awarded in 1985, the National Medal of Technology is presented by the United States President to individuals, teams, or companies, for accomplishments in the innovation, development, commercialization, and management of technology.

2006

Herwig Kogelnik

Pioneering research and leadership associated with lasers, optoelectronics, integrated optics, and lightwave communication systems.

2006

James E. West

Co-invention of the electret microphone in 1962. Ninety percent of the two billion microphones produced annually and used in everyday items such as telephones, hearing aids, camcorders, and multimedia computers employ electret technology.

2005

Alfred Cho

Invention of the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) technology and the development of the MBE technology into an advanced electronic and photonic devices production tool.

2001

Arun Netravali

Leadership in the field of communication systems and for pioneering contributions that transformed TV from analog to digital.

1998

Dennis Ritchie and Kenneth Thompson

Development of UNIX® operating system and the C programming language.

1994

Richard Frenkiel and Joel Engel

Contributions to the theory, design, and development of cellular mobile communications systems.

1993

Amos Joel

Vision and leadership in introducing electronic switching and other related communications technology.

1992

W. Lincoln Hawkins

Research leading to long-lived plastic coatings for communications cable that has saved billions of dollars for telephone companies around the world.

1990

John Mayo

Role in managing the conversion of the national switched telephone network from analog to digital-based technology.

1985

Bell Labs

Contributions over decades to modern communications systems. It was the first institution ever to be recognized with this honor.

Turing Award

First awarded in 1966 by the Association for Computing Machinery, the Turing Award is considered to be the highest distinction in Computer Science and is presented to individuals who have made lasting and highly important contributions of a technical nature to the computing community.

1986

Robert Tarjan

With John Hopcroft, for fundamental achievements in the design and analysis of algorithms and data structures.

1983

Dennis Ritchie and Kenneth Thompson

Development of generic operating systems theory and specifically for the implementation of the UNIX operating system.

1968

Richard Hamming

For work on numerical methods, automatic coding systems, and error-detecting and error-correcting codes

Kyoto Prize

The Kyoto Prize is Japan’s highest private award for global achievement. The Prize is given not only to those that are top representatives of their own respective field, but also to those that have contributed to humanity with their work.

1985

Claude Elwood Shannon

“Establishment of Mathematical Foundation of Information Theory”

2001

Izuo Hayashi and Morton B. Panish

"Success in continuous operation of semiconductor lasers at room temperature - a pioneering step in optoelectronics"

1989

Amos Edward Joel, Jr.

“Pioneering Contribution to the Electronic Switching Technology for Telecommunications, Especially that Based on the Concept of "Stored Program Control"

Marconi Society Lifetime Achievement Award

In addition to its International Fellowship Award, the Marconi Society began in 2000 to honor a small number of individuals for their lifetime of achievement

2009

Amos Joel

Recognition for his leading expertise in switching.

2003

William O. Baker

Widely recognized champion of communications research and development.

2000

Claude Shannon

Lifetime achievement in information theory.

Marconi International Fellowship Award

Awarded by the Marconi Society since 1975, the Marconi Prize is granted to individuals who have made a significant contribution to the advancement of communications through scientific or technological discoveries.

2009

Andrew Chraplyvy and Robert Tkach

Insights into how information is transmitted over optical networks and for finding innovative ways to significantly increase the speed and capacity of optical fiber communications systems.

2001

Herwig Kogelnik

Pioneering the development of fiber optic technology - work that has revolutionized modern telecommunications.

1995

Jacob Ziv

Contributions to the fields of communications and information theory, and in particular for his work on the Lempel-Ziv data compression algorithm.

1993

Izuo Hayashi

Contributions to optoelectronic technology and for his life contribution to communications science.

1992

James Flanagan

Pioneering contributions to speech technology.

1987

Robert Lucky

Invention of the automatically adaptive equalizer.

1979

John Pierce

Outstanding advances in space and satellite technologies relevant to improving world communications.

1977

Arthur Schawlow

Research in the fields of optical and microwave spectroscopy, nuclear quadruple resonance superconductivity and lasers.

Draper Prize

Since 1989, the Charles Stark Draper Prize has been awarded by the U.S. National Academy of Engineering in recognition of outstanding engineering achievements. It is considered among the highest forms of recognition within the field of engineering.

2013

Richard Frenkiel and Joel Engel

Pioneering contributions to the world’s first cellular telephone networks, systems, and standards.

2006

Williard Boyle and George Smith

The invention of the Charge-Coupled Device (CCD), a light-sensitive component at the heart of digital cameras and other widely used imaging technologies.

1999

John MacChesney

The conception and invention of optical fiber for communications and for the development of manufacturing processes that made the telecommunications revolution possible.

1995

John Pierce

Development of communication satellite technology.

Japan Prize

Established and endorsed by the Japanese cabinet in 1983 and first awarded in 1985, the Japan Prize is presented to individuals “whose original and outstanding achievements are not only scientifically impressive, but have also served to promote peace and prosperity for all mankind.”

2011

Dennis Ritchie and Kenneth Thompson

Development of the UNIX operating system.

2003

Seiji Ogawa

Discovery of the principle for functional magnetic resonance imaging.

1985

John R. Pierce

Outstanding achievement in the field of electronics and communications technologies.

C&C Prize

Established in 1985, the highly regarded C&C (Computers and Communication) Prize is awarded by the NEC Corporation to individuals for their pioneering work in the fields of semiconductors, computers, and telecommunications.

2007

John MacChesney

Pioneering contributions to research and development resulting in low-loss optical fiber.

1999

George Smith and Willard Boyle

Invention of the charge-coupled device (CCD)

1997

Barry Haskell and Arun Netravali

Pioneering work in digital video data compression technology.

1995

Akira Hasegawa

Discovery of Soliton in optical fiber and the pioneering contribution made in application of ultra-high speed optical fiber communication.

1995

Alfred Cho

Seminal contributions to molecular beam epitaxy, a technology which is revolutionizing high performance optoelectronics and electronics for computers and communications.

1991

Jack Sipress

Leadership in the development of high-speed digital fiber-guide systems that span the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean, thereby giving global digital connectivity over high capacity cables.

1989

Dennis Ritchie and Kenneth Thompson

Creation of UNIX Operating System and the C-language.

1988

Eric Summer, John Mayo, and Aaron Robert

Pioneering contributions to the establishment of a basic technology for digital communications by development of the world's first practical commercial high-speed digital communication system.

1986

Morton Panish and Izuo Hayashi

Conception and development of the first room-temperature continuous-wave semiconductor injection laser with double heterostructure.

IEEE Medal of Honor

First awarded in 1917, the IEEE Medal of Honor is the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers highest form of recognition

2005

James Flanagan

Sustained leadership and outstanding contributions in speech technology.

2001

Herwig Kogelnik

Fundamental contributions to the science and technology of lasers and optoelectronics, and for leadership in research and development of photonics and lightwave communication systems.

1994

Al Cho

Seminal contributions to the development of molecular beam epitaxy.

1992

Amos Joel

Fundamental contributions to and leadership in telecommunications switching systems.

1989

C. Kumar Patel

Fundamental contributions to quantum electronics, including the carbon dioxide laser and the spin-flip Raman laser.

1982

John Tukey

Contributions to the spectral analysis of random processes and the fast Fourier transform algorithm.

1981

Sidney Darlington

Fundamental contributions to filtering and signal processing leading to chirp radar.

1980

William Shockley

Invention of the junction transistor, the analog and the junction field - effect transistor, and the theory underlying their operation.

1977

H. Earl Vaughan

Vision, technical contributions and leadership in the development of the first high - capacity pulse-code-modulation time-division telephone switching system.

1975

John Pierce

Pioneering concrete proposals and the realization of satellite communication experiments, and for contributions in theory and design of traveling wave tubes and in electron beam optics essential to this success.

1973

Rudolf Kompfner

Major contribution to world - wide communication through the conception of the traveling wave tube embodying a new principle of amplification.

1971

John Bardeen

Profound contributions to the understanding of the conductivity of solids, to the invention of the transistor, and to the microscopic theory of superconductivity.

1967

Charles Townes

Significant contributions in the field of quantum electronics which have led to the maser and the laser.

1966

Claude Shannon

Development of a mathematical theory of communication which unified and significantly advanced the state of the art.

1963

George Southworth

Pioneering contributions to microwave radio physics, to radio astronomy, and to waveguide transmission.

1960

Harry Nyquist

Fundamental contributions to a quantitative understanding of thermal noise, data transmission and negative feedback.

National Inventors Hall of Fame

The National Inventors Hall of Fame (NIHF) is an American not-for-profit organization dedicated to honoring inventors and their inventions.

2016

Victor B. Lawrence

Signal Processing

2013

Arthur Ashkin

Optical Trapping

2011

Warren Marrison

Quartz clock

2012

C. Kumar N. Patel

Carbon Dioxide Laser

2010

Walter Lincoln Hawkins

Polymer cable sheath

2010

Vincent L. Lanza

Polymer cable sheath

2010

Field H. Winslow

Polymer cable sheath

2009

Martin Atalla

MOSFET (metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor)

2009

Dawon Kahng

Electric field controlled semiconductor device

2008

Daryl Chapin

Solar cell

2008

Calvin Souther Fuller

Solar cell

2008

Erna Schneider Hoover

Computerized telephone Switching

2008

Amos E Joel, Jr.

Switching concept for cellular phones

2008

Gerald Pearson

Solar cell

2006

Henry Affel

Coaxial Cable

2006

Willard Boyle

Charge coupled device

2006

Lloyd Espenschied

Coaxial cable

2006

Ali Javan

Helium Neon laser

2006

George E. Smith

Charge-coupled device

2004

Bernard M. Oliver

Pulse Code Modulation

2004

Claude Shannon

Pulse Code Modulation

2003

John R. Pierce

Communications Satellite

1999

Gerhard M. Sessler

Microphone

1996

Arthur Leonard Shawlow

Laser

1991

William Harrison Bennet

Mass Spectrometry

1983

George Stibitz

Digital Computer

1981

Harold Stephen Black

Feedback Amplifier

1976

Charles H. Townes

Laser

1974

Walter Houser Brattain

Transistor

1974

William Shockley

Transistor

Academy Award

The Academy Award of Merit is presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for excellence in association with cinema.

1936

E. C. Wente and Bell Labs

Scientific and Engineering Award - For their multicellular high-frequency horn and receiver.

American Academy of Arts and Sciences - Rumford Prize

The Rumford Prize, awarded by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, is one of the oldest scientific prizes in the United States. The prize recognizes contributions by scientists to the fields of heat and light.

2015

Federico Capasso and Alfred Cho

Recognized for invention and application of laser technology.

The Brain Prize

The Grete Lundbeck European Brain Research Prize – ‘The Brain Prize’- is awarded to one or more scientists who have distinguished themselves by an outstanding contribution to European neuroscience and who are still active in research.

2015

2015 Brain Prize

The 2015 Brain Prize award honors work by David Tank, Winfried Denk, Karel Svoboda (during their tenure at Bell Labs) and Arthur Konnerth that resulted in two-photon microscopes, now commercially available, that can be used to look at how brain processes

Grammy Award

Since 1959, the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences has honored individuals and organizations with a Grammy Award to recognize outstanding achievements in the field of music.

2016

Harvey Fletcher

Technical GRAMMY® for work on stereo sound.

2006

Bell Labs

Outstanding technical contributions to the recording field.

Emmy Award

The Academy of Television Arts and Sciences presents its Emmy Award in recognition of excellence in the television industry.

1994

Bell Labs

For the HDTV Grand Alliance Standard.

Recent Awards

2016

Edison Patent Award

Ilija Hadzic, Dennis R.Morgan, Zulfiquar Sayeed, Alf Neustadt - for “Method, apparatus and system for frequency synchronization between devices communicating over a packet network”

2016

R&D Council Science & Technology Medal

Marcus Weldon - for his vision for Bell Labs and directing the organization’s innovation in the pivotal areas of foundational networking technologies and systems for the ‘cloud networking’ era, via 10x game-changing research and ‘Future X’ projects.

2016

Grammy Award

Harvey Fletcher — Technical GRAMMY® Award - for contributions to the recording arts.

2016

National Inventors Hall of Fame

Victor B. Lawrence - for signal processing in telecommunications.

2015

American Academy of Arts and Sciences — Rumford Prize

Federico Capasso and Alfred Cho (2015) — Recognized for invention and application of laser technology. In 1994, at Bell Labs, Capasso and Cho invented the quantum cascade (QC) laser.

2015

2015 Brain Prize

The 2015 Brain Prize award honors work by David Tank, Winfried Denk, Karel Svoboda (during their tenure at Bell Labs) and Arthur Konnerth that resulted in two-photon microscopes, now commercially available, that can be used to look at how brain processes

2015

Dahl-Nygaard Prize

Bjarne Stroustrup was awarded the 2015 Senior Dahl-Nygaard Prize for the design, implementation and evolution of the C++ programming language.

2014

2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Eric Betzig was awarded 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry “For the Development of Super-Resolved Fluorescence Microscopy” which is capable of measuring images of molecules from within living cells.

2013

2013 IEEE Alexander Graham Bell Award

Andy Chraplyvy and Bob Tkach were honored this award for contributions to the science and technology for optical communications enabling high-speed wavelength division multiplexing through the mitigation of the effects of fiber nonlinearity.

2012

International Teletraffic Congress Arne Jensen Lifetime Achievement Award — Debasis Mitra

For outstanding contributions to tele-traffic science

2012

R35 India – Animesh Nandi

Recognized by TR35 India as one of India’s top young innovators by MIT's Technology Review magazine for his work on privacy-preserving personalization systems and large-scale distributed systems.

2012

U. S. National Academy of Engineering Membership – Alan Gnauck

For contributions to high-speed, high-capacity lightwave communications systems. Election to the NAE is considered to be among the highest recognitions in engineering-related fields, and it often comes as recognition of a lifetime's worth of accomplishments.

2011

World Technology Awards – Gabriel Charlet

For innovative work of the greatest likely long-term significance from the World Technology Network (WTN) at the United Nations Headquarters in New York. He has also been named a WTN Fellow.

2011

Optical Society 2012 Fellowship - Peter Winzer

For seminal contributions to optical communications and data networking, in particular advanced optical modulation formats and advanced optical receiver concepts.

2011

Optical Society 2012 Fellowship - Sethumadhavan Chandrasekhar

For seminal contributions to high-performance opto-electronic integrated circuits, wavelength division multiplexed transmission and high-capacity coherent optical transmission.

2010

World TR35 – Gabriel Charlet

Recognized by MIT's Technology Review magazine as one of the world’s top young innovators for Record-breaking optical fibers for global communications.

2013

TR35 France - Massimiliano Salsi

Recognized by MIT's Technology Review magazine as a top young innovator in France for his research on transmitting large amounts of data (100 Gbit/s) through transoceanic cables.

2013

U. S. National Inventors Hall of Fame - Arthur Ashkin

For his role in inventing optical trapping, also called optical tweezing, a process that traps molecules and macroscopic particles by using laser light.

2012

Optical Society 2013 Fellowship - Alice White

For developing advanced nanofabrication techniques and applying them to integrated electronics and photonics to enable next generation lightwave devices.

2012

IEEE 2013 Fellow - Antonia Tulino

For contributions to the design of algorithms and protocols for wireless networks.

2012

Optical Society 2013 Fellowship - Gregory Raybon

For pioneering contributions to high-speed optical transmission systems and technologies.

2012

IEEE 2013 Fellow - Erran Li

For contributions to the design of algorithms and protocols for wireless networks.

2012

IEEE 2013 Fellow - Rene-Jean Essiambre

For contributions to fiber nonlinearities in optical telecommunication systems.

2013

Popular Science Brilliant Ten Award

Nick Fontaine has been recognized for the Brilliant Ten award as one of North America’s top 10 young innovators by the Popular Science magazine.

2012

IEEE 2013 Edison Medal - Ivan P. Kaminow

For pioneering, life-long contributions to and leadership in photonic devices and networks instrumental to global high-capacity optical networks.

2012

IEEE 2013 Alexander Graham Bell Medal - Andrew Chraplyvy and Robert Tkach

For contributions to the science and technology of optical communications enabling high-speed wavelength division multiplexing through the mitigation of the effects of fiber nonlinearity.

2012

IEEE 2013 Fellow - Harish Viswanathan

For contributions to wireless communication systems.